Our network

Environment

Hope College Alumnus Tim Laman to Feature “Birds of Paradise” - Jan 30

Hope College Alumnus Tim Laman to Feature “Birds of Paradise” - Jan 30

HOLLAND – Large-scale projections featuring New Guinea’s colorful “Birds of Paradise” will illustrate a lecture at Hope College on Wednesday, Jan. 30, about a landmark multi-year effort, recently featured in “National Geographic,” to document all 39 of the species for the first time.

Dr. Tim Laman, a field biologist and wildlife photojournalist who is a regular contributor to “National Geographic” as well as a 1983 Hope graduate, will present the talk on Wednesday, Jan. 30, at 7:30 p.m. in the DeWitt Center main theatre.

The public is invited. Admission is free.

Laman and ornithologist Dr.

Beat January Boredom at Ottawa’s Nature Education Center

A Star’s Life: Astronomy and Sky Viewing Event

Adults and older children are invited to join members of the Shoreline Amateur Astronomical Association on Saturday, January 19 at 7:00 p.m. at the Ottawa County Parks Nature Education Center for a one hour indoor program entitled Life Cycles of Stars. Stars, just like people, go through a life cycle. They are born in “stellar nurseries,” mature, and die.  Some of them go away quietly while others explode with far reaching effects in the universe.  This program will be held rain, snow, or shine (as long as road and weather conditions are safe).
“Life Cycles of Stars” will be followed by an outdoor sky viewing session (weather permitting). Telescopes will be provided.  Bring binoculars (if you have them), and dress to be outside. There is no program fee and advance registration is not required.

Tips On Photography - Tonight and Jan 24

Tips On Photography - Tonight and Jan 24

If you'd like to learn more about capturing nature on camera, photographer John Dykstra is offering Creative Compositions tonight at 7:00 pm at the Outdoor Discovery Center. Dykstra will explain the fundamentals of photography composition. The cost is $10 per person and advance registration is required. 

On Thursday, January 24 at 7 pm John Dykstra is offering a Critique Your Photos session for nature photographers who want to improve their skills.  Participants will submit five images to be critiqued during the session. Cost is $20 per person and advance registration is required.

For more information on the classes or to register, contact the Outdoor Discovery Center-Greenway at (616) 393-9453 or odc@outdoordiscovery.org.

Environmental Organization Grades Local Lawmakers

Environmental Organization Grades Local Lawmakers

Find the grades for legislators in your district through The Sierra Club's full scorecard.  

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Holland Tree Recycling

Holland Tree Recycling
Holiday Tree Disposal & Waste Information  

The City of Holland is please to again this year offer residents the opportunity to dispose of real Christmas trees and excess holiday trash.  

CHRISTMAS TREE DISPOSAL AND HOLIDAY EXCESS TRASH

Holiday boxes, papers and excess trash will be accepted at no extra charge for two (2) weeks after Christmas Day (Dec. 26, 2012 thru January 11, 2013).

Packing Peanuts, Styrofoam and Christmas wrapping paper are NOT recyclable. They must be placed in the trash.

CITY REFUSE AND RECYCLING CUSTOMERS ONLY!
Place your Christmas tree (cut to 6 feet OR less) at the curbside on the same day as your waste service from Dec.

Haworth’s waste reduction initiatives pay off

Haworth’s waste reduction initiatives pay off

Written by  Carl Dunker

HOLLAND — While many companies may think of recycling as just a method to keep the environmentalists at bay, Haworth Inc. has found that, in fact, the practice pays off.

At least, that’s according to Bill Gurn, facilities maintenance manager at Haworth.

“A lot of businesses question if recycling pays,” Gurn said. “Bottom line is that recycling makes you money.”

Gurn has the data to back up his claim. In 2011, Haworth made a net profit of $1.4 million through its zero-waste-to-landfill program. Additionally, the company recycled 53 million pounds of different types of waste material while sending only 3 percent of waste to be burned in a waste-to-energy plant, Gurn’s least-favorite method of removing waste from landfills.