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Hope College staff members to be honored for impact on students

HOLLAND, Mich.-- Long-time staff members Tom Renner and Maura Reynolds have been named recipients of Hope College’s 14th annual Vanderbush-Weller Awards for strong, positive impact on students.

The award recognizes and supports the efforts of Hope faculty and staff who make extraordinary contributions to the lives of students. Renner, who is associate vice president for public and community relations, and Reynolds, who is director of advising and associate professor of Latin, will be honored during a luncheon on Thursday, May 2.

“There is no doubt that Maura and Tom are two people who have shaped students and influenced Hope College in profound ways,” said Dr. Richard Frost, vice president and dean of students at Hope, whose office coordinates the award, which is presented based on nominations from the campus community. “Their spirit and competence is exceptional, but their heart is what makes them special.”

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How police handle a missing persons case

HOLLAND, Mich. (WZZM) -- With so many people interested in the Jessica Heeringa investigation, WZZM 13 is taking a look at how detectives investigate a missing person's case.

Holland Police recently looked for Emelene Vandyke for weeks before learning she was safe in New Mexico. WZZM 13 spoke to police about the steps they took following her disappearance.

The Holland Police Department gets missing person reports and tips year round. "Most of them turn out to be something simple," says Captain Robert Buursma.

Investigators believed a simple answer would find Emelene Vandyke but as weeks passed without finding her, the case captured national attention.

"With possible sightings and a variety of locations," says Captain Buursma. "We dedicated more resources to it, turns out she was one of those-- as we all know now-- she was one of those that chose to leave."

Cloudy, cold April impacts local greenhouses

HOLLAND, Mich. (WZZM) -- April showers aren't bringing may flowers as quickly as they should this year. Some local greenhouses say a streak of cloudy and cold days has flowers growing slower and it's putting a damper on business so far this season.

The flower stems at JW Greenhouses are grasping for any sunlight they can get.

"The elongated stems would be a direct result of lack of sunshine," says Joel Miedema, owner of JW Greenhouses. They reach for light and the light is not there so they keep stretching."

Some stems are shorter than others, which JW Greenhouses says is not the appearance most customers want. Workers have been cutting back the flowers stems to allow them to regrow the same length.

"We've cut a lot of our baskets, probably thousands of baskets," says Miedema. "It sets this basket back probably a week to ten days, but it's worth the effort because of the end product."

Elderly driver dies, medical condition possible cause

HOLLAND, Mich. (WZZM) -- Police are investigating whether a medical condition caused a deadly single-vehicle accident Wednesday morning. The crash happened at 10:55 a.m. at U.S. 31 and Greenly Street.

Ottawa County Sheriff's Deputies say a 79-year-old Spring Lake Township man was driving southbound when he lost control of his Ford Fiesta and veered off the highway. The vehicle traveled several hundred yards before striking a small tree and rolling over.

The driver was pinned in the vehicle and pronounced dead at Holland Hospital. His name is being withheld until family is notified.

Witnesses say the driver had been weaving and swerving before the accident. Authorities say alcohol was not a factor in the crash.

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Hope College to present popular Tulip Time Organ Recitals

Hope College to present popular Tulip Time Organ Recitals

HOLLAND, Mich. – Hope College’s popular contribution to Holland’s annual Tulip Time festival will continue with organ recitals in Dimnent Memorial Chapel, May 8 through May 11.

The public is invited. Admission is free.

Occurring every half-hour, the 20 minute performances begin at 10 a.m. with the last performance beginning at 1:30 p.m.

Two organs will be used in the recitals: the Chancel Organ, which was built in 1929 by the E.M. Skinner Organ Company of Boston, Mass., and renovated in 2005 and 2006, and the Gallery Organ, built in 1970 by Pels and Van Leeuwen Organ Company of Alkmaar, in the Netherlands.

Dimnent Memorial Chapel is located at 277 College Ave., on College Avenue at 12th Street.

Bicyclist struck by car, killed

HOLLAND, Mich. (WZZM) - A 70-year-old bicyclist is dead after being struck by a car Monday night in Holland. 

Gene Alan Mitchell of Holland was attempting to cross US 31 westbound against the light.  Indications are traffic for US 31 had a green light and traffic was moving at highway speeds. 

The vehicle driven by 48-year-old Pierre Lynn Hulsebus of Grandville struck Mitchell, who was pronounced dead at the scene.  Alcohol does not appear to be involved in the collision, but Holland Police are still investigating. 

Anyone with information should contact the Holland Department of Public Safety at 616-355-1100. 

 

  

Hope College to award honorary degrees to leaders of Haworth

HOLLAND, Mich. – Hope College will award Richard Haworth and the late Gerrard W. Haworth honorary degrees during the college’s commencement ceremony on Sunday, May 5, in recognition of their leadership of Haworth, Inc. and commitment to the community and education.

“Haworth, Inc. and the Haworth family have been helpfully engaged with Hope College for many years.  The vision of G.W. and Dick for both design and function in the furniture industry has been widely recognized, and their generosity to education and community is likewise exemplary.  Hope has been the recipient of their commitment and wise counsel.  It is entirely appropriate and fitting that we honor them with Hope's highest award, the honorary doctorate degree,” said Dr. James E. Bultman, president of Hope College.